Evelyn Doane - William Raveis Real Estate - Cape Cod



Posted by Evelyn Doane on 8/18/2019

We live in the 21st century and the age of technology, this we know. But, what some sellers still do not realize is the importance of properly staged and well taken photos. The photos that you place online with your home’s listing can make or break a buyer’s interest. If you do not feel confident in your own ability to take the photos then you may want to consider hiring a photographer. However, if you feel capable of taking the photos that will be a buyer’s first look, then review the pointers below.

1. Proper lighting: Proper lighting when taking photos is essential. The lighting can completely alter the look of a home; a poorly lit room can look older and smaller than it actually is. To avoid this, try taking photos during the daytime when there is plenty of natural light, but when the sun is not beating into the room as it can cause shadows. The natural light is an ideal situation, as different lightbulbs give off different levels and color of light.

2. Avoid blurry photos: Posting out of focus photos to your listing is asking for a buyer to overlook your home. They are not only uncomplimentary but detrimental to a buyer’s interest. Make sure to keep the camera or phone (only high-end phones) steady and have proper lighting when taking the photos. It would be best to utilize a tripod or a stabilizer, if you have access to one.

3. Choose your angles wisely: All too often photos are shot up close on a feature in the room. This does not give the buyer an accurate depiction of what the room truly looks like. It’s hard to tell its size and its shape. Try standing in a doorway or inside of a closet, so you are able to photograph most of the room. But, be sure not to use a wide-angle camera lens, as it can distort the room and give buyers a false pretense of its size.

4. Remove clutter: Taking photos of your home for your online listing while there is clutter all over is not the best way to showcase your home. It will make your rooms look smaller and be harder for one to visualize his/her belongings in that space.

5. Remove personal items: When selling your home, you want buyers to be able to envision themselves living there. It’s important to remove overly personal items for open houses and it’s also important to do so when taking photographs of your home.

These are just a couple pointers for taking photos that peak buyers’ interests in your home. If you are very inexperienced in photography,be sure to do additional research, so you are taking the best photos possible.And again, if you’re unsure of your ability, it might be best to leave it to the professional—as a first impression is everything.





Posted by Evelyn Doane on 8/11/2019

Looking for a way to make your living room cozier or wanting to add some softer touches to your family room. These great ideas will get you started.

Find your fabric

  • Faux fur – check out the furry rugs and pillows available at your favorite home goods stores. You’ll find animal print plush the add some luxe to your leather sofa. Or choose a bright-hued long-haired cushion to add that punch of color to that monotone sectional.
  • Real fur – Well … real hair, anyway. A fringed coverlet of llama, lamb, or another high-loft wool brings warmth and texture to any space.
  • Velvet or velour, or even fuzzy microfiber or shag adds a softer touch, so think floor pillows, bolsters, or shams.

Natural woods

Wood has natural warmth that adds a subtle glow to otherwise stark contemporary décor. And if you add a touch of antique oak, walnut, or pine into the mix, you’ve created a space with depth and character. So, bring out that side table you inherited, or frame your contemporary print in a simple wood frame. Set the walnut dish your dad carved in high school shop on the mantel. 

Holistic elements

In addition to wood and fabric, other natural features can warm up your motif. Think a bevy of baskets, dried or faux but realistic willow stems, a cluster of beautiful stones, or even a collection of shells gives character and interest to a design.

Opt for an Ottoman

Everyone loves a place to put their feet. An upholstered ottoman in a comfortable fabric gives instant comfort to the room. If you'd rather have a more durable cover on your footstool such as leather or vinyl, the add a plush throw to it to bring in the warmth.

Collections

Sometimes, collections get out of hand, so we’re not talking about taking over every space with your blown glass figurines. But a lovely jar filled with sea glass from your last beach trip puts a warm glow in an otherwise serene bath or bedroom.

Group larger collection pieces in threes. If you inherited Aunt Mildred’s red glass vase, and another blue one from your grandmother, add a third one (even from a thrift store) to give interest to the collection and set it on a sofa table or in the center of the coffee table. Avoid putting more than three (at the very most four) items on any surface to avoid a cluttered, disorganized look.

If you plan to place your home on the market, ask your realtor to recommend a professional home stager to help you add that coveted coziness you crave.




Categories: home decor   furniture   living room  


Posted by Evelyn Doane on 8/4/2019

For most homeowners, a home is not just a property with four walls and a roof over their head. Over time, it becomes a place that reminds them of sweet memories spent with family and friends. Buying a home is expensive, and as a result, it is essential that you relegate any form of emotions and apply business-minded strategies in making good decisions. With this in mind, here are some costly emotional mistakes home buyers make and how you can avoid making them.

Falling in love too quickly

Buying a home can play with your emotions. But you must balance your dreams with the realities of your budget. Turn a deaf ear when the agent tells you "Oh, this house was made for you," or "It suits you perfectly," Focus on what you want in terms of space, location, maintenance, and the price. If you are buying a house, buy the one you need rather than what you want.

Allowing others to "steer" the process 

Agents and family members can be assertive in attempting to "tell" you what home to buy. What's more, friends who won't even live in the house will aggressively offer opinions about the subject. In an attempt to please others, some homeowners get highly emotional and buy a house they never liked. It is your house, and you will be the one living in it. Friends and loved ones only visit. So put yourself in charge of the buying process. 

Overpaying for a property 

Another common emotional mistake homebuyers make is paying too much for a property. Buyers—especially new ones—always tend to become desperate to buy a house or buy a house in a popular area, and most time, they end up paying far too much for the property. To avoid overpaying for a home, keep your emotional side locked and check the prices of similar houses in the area to avoid being ripped off. 

Putting the pen on paper too soon 

Generally, before you purchase a house, you need to sign a contract and pay a deposit. However, don't get too excited and sign the contract immediately you make the decision. Take your time to read through every line of the agreement. Also, get a seasoned lawyer or property professional to guide you, to ensure your interest comes first and insert any needed clauses. It is tough to make changes once you sign a contract.

Although buying a house can be an emotional experience, it is also an exciting time. Avoiding emotional mistakes, doing your research and keeping a calm head should help you to get a good home that meets all your needs.




Categories: Real estate   buying tips   homebuyers  


Posted by Evelyn Doane on 7/28/2019

Because real estate is a people-oriented business, most agents are happy to answer questions and provide advice after the sale. Whether you've enlisted their help to purchase a house or sell one, your working relationship does not have to end the moment you sign the final papers.

Professionals in the real estate business are generally service-oriented and interested in cultivating ongoing client relationships. If you've been fortunate enough to find a real estate agent who exceeded your expectations, then they'll most likely be a resource you'll want to use down the road. Assuming you had good rapport and that you're satisfied with their service, here are a few solid reasons to keep in touch.

Reliable source of advice: When you consider the training, knowledge, and experience that a seasoned real estate agent has, having them as a professional contact can benefit you in a number of ways. As an example, many agents are familiar with the impact home improvements can have on resale value. In other words, if you're thinking about upgrading, expanding, or altering your property, a knowledgeable real estate agent can provide insights into how that might affect your home's current and future market value. Since every type of home improvement brings with it a potential return on investment (ROI), it's an important aspect to consider when remodeling, adding an addition, or making a major change to your property. Many real estate agents have cultivated relationships with dependable contractors, remodelers, and installers to whom they may be happy to refer you, too. As a homeowner, you will invariably need reliable recommendations, sooner or later, and real estate agents are often a great source of contractor referrals. As you may have already discovered, it can be a frustrating experience to try to find a good home improvement contractor or other service provider when you're starting from scratch or relying on the credibility of online reviews.

Help for friends and family: If you're not planning on buying or selling a home in the near future, there's a good chance someone you know would benefit from the help and advice of a proven real estate professional. Even if a family member or acquaintance just needs assistance in finding an affordable apartment or house to rent, real estate agents often have the connections and resources to provide options that others may have overlooked.

Income and Investment properties: After shelling out tens of thousands of dollars to landlords, over the years, some homeowners consider "turning the tables" and becoming landlords and real estate investors, themselves. While this is certainly not a guaranteed path to financial independence, some people do become quite successful at it. If you have a tolerance for risk and the tenacity to pursue it, then your real estate agent may be able to help you find some worthwhile income properties. It's not for everybody, though!

Finding a real estate agent who's results oriented, experienced, and a pleasure to work with is not an everyday event, but when it does happen, they're worth keeping as a trusted advisor for many years to come!





Posted by Evelyn Doane on 7/21/2019

The process of applying for a mortgage is tedious and time-consuming; it requires you to answer personal questions about your finances. To ascertain your credibility for a mortgage, lenders structured the application process in such a way that allows them to get as much information about borrowers either directly or indirectly. 

Before you decide to apply for a mortgage; it's best you familiarize yourself with some of the possible questions the lender would ask about your finances. Because it involves a considerable amount of money, you should be prepared to answer questions about disparities in your income, why you defaulted in making any accrued payments and questions about your credit history. 

Below are some of the possible questions your lender would ask relating to your finances. 

How long have you earned your present income?

Lenders want to ascertain if you have earned your present pay for over two years. If you just got promoted or got a salary raise recently, this is good. However, what most lenders are looking out for is a consistent income amount for the last year. If they are not sure of your income, they would take a look at your W-2s for previous years and your pay stub for the present year. Before you go ahead to make an offer for a house, ensure it's an amount your current income will support.

How often you get paid?

A lender wants to ascertain how much income you earn, how your pay is derived, and the steadiness of your salary or irregularity of income. If you receive a steady means of income, your annual salary would determine how much mortgage you get – if your income varies, you might be required to provide details. 

The disparities in your income

If your income keeps changing each year either positively or negatively, come prepared to explain the reason behind the fluctuation. If your revenue decreased from the previous year, there is every possibility the underwriter would select the worst period in the last two years to determine how much you get on a mortgage. However, if your income increased in the previous year, the underwriter would take the average of the last two years to determine your mortgage value. If your income rises yearly either due to promotion or a new position, get someone from your human resource department to write a letter to that effect. 

If you are new at your job

Being new at a job doesn't affect your application for getting a mortgage – as long as you are receiving either a salary or a full-time hourly rate. Some lenders even grant loans to individuals who haven't gotten their first paycheck if they have a fully executed employment contract. 

If you earn commissions 

If you are a salesperson who earns a commission, you would need to provide two full years of tax returns to determine non-reimbursed business expenses you wrote off. 

Before applying for a mortgage, ensure you take a second look at all your finances and identified anything that could act as a deterrent so that your application has the best chance of being approved.